31 January 2011

Rook v. Rook & Pawn | Main Position Black to Draw

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Today's chess video is dedicated to the rook v. rook & pawn endgame, which is the most common ending in chess. The name of the video is "Rook v. Rook & Pawn. Main Position Black to Draw," and seeing it is important for learning how to play the rook endgame.

The video shows a fundamental position in the rook v. rook & pawn endgame. The position is as follows: The weaker Black King is before the pawn - not behind it. The pawn and the stronger White King did not cross the 6th rank (3rd rank for Black, if Black is stronger).

In the above position, Black can draw this rook endgame in several ways. Under his move, Black has 2 ways of draw. The video will show only way 1, which is easier to learn. Way 2 is not shown because of many complications. If White to move, Black has only 1 way of draw.

The video runs as one unit. At the beginning, it introduces the initial position. Black: king and rook. White: king, rook and pawn. The video shows 2 ways of how Black can draw under 3 different scenarios... To start the video, just click the Play button below:




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See the links to all chess videos on rook v. rook & pawn endgame:

Rook Endgame and "Building a Bridge"
Rook & Pawn v. Rook. How to Win 2 Positions
Rook v. Rook & Pawn. Main Position & Black Blunder

21 January 2011

Rook v. Rook & Pawn | Main Position & Black Blunder

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Today's chess video is dedicated to the rook v. rook & pawn endgame, which is the most common ending in chess. The name of the video is "Rook v. Rook & Pawn. Main Position & Black Blunder." The video is not completed - It is only part I, and part II of this video will follow.

The video shows one of the most important positions in the rook v. rook & pawn endgame. The position is as follows: The weaker King is before the pawn - not behind it. The pawn and the stronger White King did not cross the 6th rank (3rd rank for Black, if Black is stronger).

For the weaker player in the rook v. rook & pawn endgame, it is important to keep his or her King before the opponent pawn but not behind it. The weaker player must draw such positions. Also, the weaker player must avoid a typical blunder which is shown in the video.

This chess video includes the next 2 parts: Part I is titled "Main Position." It shows an important position for the rook v. rook & pawn endgame. Part II is titled "Black Can Draw It." It shows the first correct moves to draw. To start the video, click the Play button below:




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You saw a video on the rook v. rook & pawn endgame. You learned a main position that is very important for this ending. You learned the Black blunder. You understood that the weaker player could draw this position in several ways... The next video will show you how to draw.

14 January 2011

Rook & Pawn v. Rook | How to Win 2 Positions

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This chess video is dedicated to the rook endgame - and namely to the rook and pawn v. rook ending. The name of the video is "Rook & Pawn v. Rook: How to Win 2 Positions." The video will show in a visible way how to win 2 typical positions in the rook endgame.

The following is short description of 2 typical positions. White is stronger in both. Position 1. White: King, rook and a pawn. King outside, the rook on a8 blocking from promotion its own pawn on a7. Black: King and rook. The rook is attacking the White pawn from a1.

Position 2. White: King, rook and a pawn. King outside, the rook on a8 blocking from promotion its own pawn on a7. Black: King and rook. The rook is attacking the White pawn but from b7, the Black King is closer. Position 1 and Position 2 have 2 different ways of winning.

The chess video is simple in build and includes the following 2 parts: Part I is titled "How to Win Position 1." Part II is titled "How to Win Position 2." The introduction points out the importance of both positions. To start the video, click the Play button below:




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You have seen the chess video on rook ending - rook & pawn v. rook - and how to win 2 typical positions in this endgame. You are recommended to learn the winning tactics for the above 2 typical positions because the rook endings are the most common in chess.

10 January 2011

Rook Endgame and "Building a Bridge"

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Today's chess video is dedicated to the chess endgame - and namely to the rook endings. The name of the video is "Rook Endgame and Building a Bridge." This chess video will show you in a visible way how to win some rook endings using the building a bridge techniques.

What is the building a bridge tactics in chess? This is a maneuver used by the stronger player in some rook endings (rook and pawn vs rook) to win the endgame. "Building a bridge" is using the rook to shield its own King from upcoming checks and promote the pawn.

It was the legendary Nimzovich who was the first to call this maneuver as "building a bridge." Building a bridge may be success only when the opponent King is apart of the pawn by 2 columns at least. To get the idea, you are recommended to see the next video.

The video in question is made up of 3 parts. Part I will propose you to win a rook ending position in "usual way." Part II will explain what is "building a bridge." Part III will show you how it works in real. To start the video, click the Play button below:




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It is better to see once than to hear 100 times. You have seen the video on rook endgame and on the building a bridge techniques that is used in the rook endgame. You should learn this tactics because the rook endings are the most common in the game of chess.

05 January 2011

Chess Endings | Bishop v. Bishop & Pawn | Same Color

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Today's chess video is dedicated to the chess endgame - the bishop chess endings. Its name is "Bishop v. Bishop & Pawn. The Same Color". The video will show a few rules how to play the bishop endings where both chess players have the bishops of the same color.

The following is more to read in short on the topic before you see the video... The chess endings with the bishops of the different colors usually end in a draw. The chess endings with the bishops of the same color usually is a win or draw with 50/50 possibility.

When entering the bishop v. bishop & pawn (bishops the same color) ending, it is important to have the King close enough to the promoting pawn. If you a weaker party, more chances to take the pawn and draw. If stronger, more chances to promote the pawn and win.

The video below includes the introduction. It will show a chess game between 2 grandmasters on the bishops ending. Black has lost but missed a draw. Learn now how White has won and see how Black could draw... To start the video, just click the Play button below:




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It is better to see once than to hear 100 times.
You have seen the video on the bishop endings and thank you for visiting!